Max Neunhöffer, Author at ArangoDB

Sign up for ArangoDB Cloud

Before signing up, please accept our terms & conditions and privacy policy.

What to expect after you signup
You can try out ArangoDB Cloud FREE for 14 days. No credit card required and you are not obligated to keep using ArangoDB Cloud.

At the end of your free trial, enter your credit card details to continue using ArangoDB Cloud.

If you decide that ArangoDB Cloud is not (yet) for you, you can simply leave and come back later.

libgcc: When exceptions collide

01GeneralTags: ,

This is a story of an excursion to the bottom of a deep rabbit hole, where I discovered a foot gun in gcc‘s libgcc. The investigation has cost me several days and I hope that by writing this up I can entertain others and save them the journey.

TL;DR

If a C++ application is compiled with GCC on Linux and statically linked against a non-GLibC C-library (like libmusl), then there is a danger of a data race which leads to a busy loop happening after main() and all static destructors have finished. The race happens, if the application does not use pthread_cancel explicitly and if the very first exception which is thrown in the processes’ life is thrown in two different threads at the same time.
Read more

Run multiple versions of ArangoDB in parallel using the .tar.gz distribution

00GeneralTags: ,

This post uses the new .tar.gz binary distribution of ArangoDB to run multiple versions of ArangoDB alongside each other on the same machines. We will do a production-ready deployment on 3 cloud instances with authentication, TLS encryption, (self-signed) certificates and systemd service. In the end, we show how to perform a rolling upgrade for one of the clusters to a new version.

Interested in trying out ArangoDB? Fire up your cluster in just a few clicks with ArangoDB Oasis: the Cloud Service for ArangoDB. Start your free 14-day trial here
Read more

Deploying ArangoDB 3.4 on Kubernetes

01GeneralTags: ,

It has been a few months since we first released the Kubernetes operator for ArangoDB and started to brag about it. Since then, quite a few things have happened.

For example, we have done a lot of testing, fixed bugs, and by now the operator is declared to be production ready for three popular public Kubernetes offerings, namely Google Kubernetes Engine (GKE), Amazon Elastic Kubernetes Service (EKS) and Pivotal Kubernetes Service (PKS) (see here for the current state of affairs). Read more

Static binaries for a C++ application

02GeneralTags: , ,
TL;DR; This describes how to generate a completely static binary for a complex C++ application which runs on all variants of Linux without any library dependency.

ArangoDB is a multi-model database written in C++. It is a sizable application with an executable size of 38MB (stripped) and quite some library dependencies. We provide binary packages for Linux, Windows and MacOS, and for Linux we cover all major distributions and their different versions, which makes our build and delivery pipeline extremely cluttered and awkward. At the beginning of this story, we needed approximately 12 hours just to build and publish a release, if everything goes well. This is the beginning of a tale to attack this problem. Read more

Performance Impact of Meltdown and Spectre V1 Patches on ArangoDB

01GeneralTags: , ,

To investigate the impact of the Meltdown and Spectre patches on the performance of ArangoDB, we ran benchmark tests with the two storage engines available in ArangoDB (MMFiles & RocksDB). We used the arangobench benchmark and test tool for these tests.

The tests include 10 different test cases with changing test parameters like concurrency, batch requests and asynchronous execution. Read more

RocksDB smoothing for ArangoDB customers

01GeneralTags:

I have varying levels of familiarity with Google’s original leveldb and three of its derivatives. RocksDB is one of the three. In each of the four leveldb offerings, the code is optimized for a given environment. Google’s leveldb is optimized for a cell phone, which has much more limited resources than a server. RocksDB is optimized for flash arrays on a large servers (per various Rocksdb wiki pages). Note that a flash array is a device of much higher throughput than a SATA or SSD drive or array. It is a device that sits on the processor’s bus. RocksDB’s performance benchmark page details a server with 24 logical CPU cores, 144GB ram, and two FusionIO flash PCI devices. Each FusionIO device cost about $10,000 at the time of the post. So RocksDB is naturally tuned for extremely fast and expensive systems. Here is an example Arangodb import on a machine similar to the RocksDB performance tester: Read more

Milestone 1 ArangoDB 3.3: Datacenter to Datacenter Replication

02General, ReleasesTags: ,

Every company needs a disaster recovery plan for all important systems. This is true from small units like single processes running in some container to the largest distributed architectures. For databases in particular this usually involves a mixture of fault-tolerance, redundancy, regular backups and emergency plans. The larger a data store, the more difficult is it to come up with a good strategy.

Therefore, it is desirable to be able to run a distributed database in one datacenter and replicate all transactions to another datacenter in some way. Often, transaction logs are shipped over the network to replicate everything in another, identical system in the other datacenter. Some distributed data stores have built-in support for multiple datacenter awareness and can replicate between datacenters in a fully automatic fashion.

This post gives an overview over the first evolutionary step of ArangoDB towards multi-datacenter support, which is asynchronous datacenter to datacenter replication.

Read more

Sorting number strings numerically

00GeneralTags:

Recently I gave a talk about ArangoDB in front of a community of mathematicians. I advertised that nearly arbitrary data can “easily” be stored in a JSON based document store. The moment I had uttered the word “easily”, one of them asked about long integers. And if a mathematician says “long integer” they do not mean 64bit but “properly long”. He actually wanted to store orders of finite groups. I said one should use a JSON UTF-8 string for this but I should have seen the next question coming because he then wanted that a sorted index would actually sort the documents by the numerical value stored in the string. But most databases – and ArangoDB is no exception here – will compare UTF-8 strings lexicographically (dictionary order). Read more

Secure Your Spot Today For ArangoDB Summit.

Join Team Avocado on October 4th and 5th, 2022 for our first ever two day industry event.
REGISTER NOW!
close-link
Click Me