Slides: Is multi-model the future of NoSQL?

00Future-of-nosql, PresentationTags: ,

Here is a slideshare and recording of my talk about multi-model databases, presented in Santa Clara earlier this month.

Abstract: Recently a new breed of “multi-model” databases has emerged. They are a document store, a graph database and a key/value store combined in one program. Therefore they are able to cover a lot of use cases which otherwise would need multiple different database systems. This approach promises a boost to the idea of “polyglot persistence“, which has become very popular in recent years although it creates some friction in the form of data conversion and synchronisation between different systems. This is, because with a multi-model database one can enjoy the benefits of polyglot persistence without the disadvantages.

In this talk I will explain the motivation behind the multi-model approach, discuss its advantages and limitations, and will then risk to make some predictions about the NoSQL database market in five years time. More info

Webinar: Polyglot Persistence & Multi-Model Databases – March, 24th

00Community, PresentationTags:

We travel around the world to join meetups and conferences, talking about the benefits of NoSQL in general, multi-model databases and ArangoDB in particular. Not yet had the chance to attend?

This time, you can join Michaels presentation about polyglot persistence & multi-model databases via Webinar.

Here’s the agenda for the Webinar on March, 24th at 1 pm EDT / 6pm CET: More info

ArangoDB at FOSDEM 2014

00General, PresentationTags: , ,

FOSDEM is an absolutely open and free conference in Brussels, Belgium. The conference offers an impressive amount of developer rooms discussing a broad range of technical topics, including NoSQL and graphs.

After a funny and productive ArangoDB hackathon weekend Frank and I arrived at FOSDEM on Sunday noon. We were looking forward to the talks in the graph devroom, but unfortunately for us it was not possible to enter the room (it was overfull, indicating a great quality of talks).
At the next speakers change Frank and I managed to slip into the room and could enjoy two inspiring talks by Neo4J.
Afterwards it was my turn to present the graph visualization interface in ArangoDB in a still crowded room (slides).
After my presentation, we handed out all our ArangoDB t-shirts to our fans.

Michael handing out T-Shirts to the audience

Michael handing out T-Shirts to the audience

All together it was a great experience and a really huge amount of people visiting the same conference which impressed me a lot.
Thanks for the team at the Graph Processing devroom for giving me the opportunity to speak and for organizing such a great devroom.
We will meet again next year.

so long,
Michael

(German video) Nosql meets mobile.cologne

03PresentationTags: ,

Last week Jan (core member of ArangoDB and the brain behind AQL and many other parts) was invited by “mobile.cologne” – a user group here in Cologne dealing with mobile development.

In this talk Jan gives a general overview on nosql databases and the different flavors. He explains how to query a nosql database and he evaluates how a nosql database can be used in a mobile app.

Warning: The talk is in German. If you want to hear it in English, let us know in the comments. 🙂

“NoSQL meets mobile.cologne” by Jan Steemann.

MRuby, JIT, and ArangoDB at RuPy 2012

00API, Presentation, RubyTags: ,

@moonbeamlabs and I hold a workshop about ArangoDB and the Ruby driver Ashikawa, which will hopefully become one of the first DataMapper 2 NoSQL drivers. Currently, we are using the aequitas and virtus components of DataMapper 2.

Slides of the workshop can be found on slideshare:

I also gave a short talk about the possibilities of using MRuby in ArangoDB. In preparation for this talk, Achim did some experiments using JIT compilation of the RiteVM bytecode using LLVM. The results are consistent with result for other byte-compiled languages. You can expect a speed-up of 2 using LLVM. In order to gain larger improvements one needs type inference and optimizations to the method selection. Luckily within a context like ArangoDB one can expects to be dealing a lot with primitives types (floats and strings) and a fixed environment. So it seems plausible that one can eventually get near the performace of V8.