Tutorial Archives - Page 5 of 6 - ArangoDB

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Analyzing Git commits with ArangoDB

00API, Query LanguageTags:

I often find myself searching for certain commits using git log and friends. While I really love the power and flexibility that come with the git and other Unix command-line tools, sometimes it can be more convenient to use a database to filter and aggregate commit data.

I gave it a quick try yesterday and imported the commit history of ArangoDB’s Git repository into ArangoDB and ran some queries on the data.

While the query results for our repository may not be interesting for everyone, I think it is still worth sharing what I did. Even though I didn’t try it, I think the overall procedure is applicable with any other Git repository.

More queries and how to convert and import Git commits in ArangoDB: Read on in Jan’s Blog

Running ArangoDB is as simple as …

07GeneralTags:

I’ve created an automated build repository on docker, so that you can easily start a docker container with the latest stable release. If you miss anything in the container, please let me know. Thanks to frodenas, hipertracker, joaodubas, webwurst who also created dockerfiles.

ArangoDB

A distributed open-source database with a flexible data model for documents, graphs, and key-values. Build high performance applications using a convenient sql-like query language or JavaScript extensions.

Start a ArangoDB instance

In order to start an ArangoDB instance run

By default ArangoDB listen on port 8529 for request and the image includes EXPOST 8529. If you link an application container, it is automatically available in the linked container. See the following examples. More info

Cookbook – Recipes to make with ArangoDB

09DocumentationTags: ,

It’s new – and just for you! With the new ArangoDB Cookbook we want to guide you thru various challenges that might arise in your daily business with NoSQL – and ArangoDB in particular.

You have a problem with or need an introduction to NoSQL data modeling / scaling ArangoDB / building Foxx apps / graph processing or something related to your favorite programming language? Then have a look if there’s a recipe match in the Cookbook!

Create your own recipes and help others in the ArangoDB community. We appreciate every participation that makes the cookbook a valuable source for ArangoDB users. Just write your problem description and solution in plain markdown and start a pull request on Github.

Need an example?

Lets assume you checked the foxx introduction on our website and now you want to build your own Foxx app, but you don’t know how to start.

More info

Arangodb Java Driver and Graphs – Part 2

03Graphs, Java, Query LanguageTags: , , ,

After defining a graph and filling it with some vertices and edges (see part 1), the time has come to retrieve information out of the graph.

Please take a look at the defined graph operations of ArangoDB. These will be the base for our next examples. (Yes, there may be other ways to get the results, this post does not claim completeness!)

We will start with some easy stuff and then smoothly advance in complexity.

Question: “How many edges are defined within the graph?”

More info

Arangodb Java Driver and Graphs – Part 1

00Graphs, JavaTags: , , ,

With ArangoDB 2.2 the new graph API was released featuring multi collection graphs (see blog). With the new version (2.2.1) of arangodb-java-driver the new graph API is supported. In the following you can find a small example of creating a graph with Java.

For the import via maven and configuring the driver, please read the Basics and Driver Setup. For the following we assume, that arangodbDriver is a configured instance of the driver.

So let’s start the whole thing…

More info

How to use the ArangoDB Java Driver in batch and asynchronous mode?

01General, JavaTags: , ,

The current arangodb-java-driver supports the usage of ArangoDB’s batch and asynchronous interface. This post will guide you through the usage of these features.

The batch interface

The batch interface enables the user to stack a series of calls and execute them in a batch request. Each stacked request returns a request id that can be used to retrieve the single results from the batch response. So how do you use this feature in the java driver ?

First we create an instance of the java driver:

More info

How to Set Up Bash Completion for ArangoDB

00General, LinuxTags:

I was interested in how bash auto-completion works and how to write a custom completer. After about an hour of work, I came up with a solution that at least seems to work on Ubuntu. I now have auto-completion for ArangoDB and all its client tools!

The problem

I use the command-line for almost everything, including starting and stopping ArangoDB and its client tools. They provide lots of options which I cannot completely memorize.

The bash solution for “I don’t know what I am looking for” is to press the TAB key. This will bring up a list of suggestions for how to complete the currently entered word. I thought using the same thing for ArangoDB’s command-line options would be nice, too.

Read more on Jan’s Blog

How to Compile ArangoDB From Source

00C++, LinuxTags:

Though we provide a lot of pre-built packages for the stable versions of ArangoDB here, it is often more interesting to play with the bleeding edge development version. New ArangoDB features are normally added to the devel branch, where they can be tested, documented and improved. When a feature matures, it is either backported to a stable branch or will eventually be released when the next stable branch is forked from devel.

Contributing to the core of ArangoDB is also much easier with a ready-to-go devel version. This post explains how to set one up from scratch.

Read more on Jan’s Blog